Measuring What Matters: Planning Outcomes Research Report

Author RTPI

This report by the Royal Town Planning Institute offers a toolkit for planning demonstrating the value of it and how it contributes to environmental, economic and societal outcomes, and therefore it proves a useful evidence base across all levels of government.

Date added 26 October 2021
Last updated 26 October 2021

*This resource is about indicators contributing to planning outcomes. It is not specifically about the High Street but has been included in response to requests for more studies/information about this topic, as well as linking to the Place Management priority for High Street vitality and viability*

This report by the Royal Town Planning Institute offers a toolkit for planning demonstrating the value of it and how it contributes to environmental, economic and societal outcomes, and therefore it proves a useful evidence base across all levels of government. The tool can be used for any stage of a plan and can be used as part of an annual monitoring process or as part of a plan-making and implementation cycle. The research resulting in the toolkit identified eight outcome themes where the tool can contribute to integration for areas of change and influence the planning system:

  1. Place – design and people
  2. Health and wellbeing
  3. Environment – conservation and improvement
  4. Climate change
  5. Homes and community
  6. Movement
  7. Economy and town centres
  8. Process and engagement

Each of the themes comprise their own set of indicators, that are designed to address national, regional and local policy outcomes. There is also a comparative scoring method (1-5) for the indicators to provide insight around achievements against objectives across policies, plans as well as the eight themes.

The toolkit data available can be used by a wide range of stakeholders including:

  • Citizens, civic groups, residents and business stakeholders within the area who need to measure place-based outcomes (for example for funding reporting).
  • Developers, investors and consultants behind key masterplan and development projects, looking to ensure that their proposals are outcomes-based and compliant with wider aims.
  • Researchers such as universities, professional bodies and even the local and national media (consider interest in Covid-19 statistics).
  • New cross sectoral planning partnerships – e.g. public-private or non-governmental organisations – as a basis for tracking new plans and strategies.